krzysztof pacholak

  1. People run to shelter from a hailstorm on the beach at Ob River, the major river in western Siberia in Novosibirsk, Russia.

(Photo by Nikita Dudnik—AP)

Pictures of the Week: July 11 - July 18 | http://ti.me/UeccOO

    People run to shelter from a hailstorm on the beach at Ob River, the major river in western Siberia in Novosibirsk, Russia.

    (Photo by Nikita Dudnik—AP)

    Pictures of the Week: July 11 - July 18 | http://ti.me/UeccOO

  2. grantharder:

HUBS MOTEL. Wells, BC. 
You can park your snowmobile at your door. 

    grantharder:

    HUBS MOTEL. Wells, BC. 

    You can park your snowmobile at your door. 

  3. postcardsfromamerica:

    Donovan Wylie.  West Virginia Street.  Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

  4. postcardsfromamerica:

    Donovan Wylie.  The Preparatory City.  Marquette Interchange.  Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  (The Marquette Interchange is the largest construction project in the State’s history.)

    Jacob Aue Sobol and Alessandra Sanguinetti join Donovan in Milwaukee today.  Come see all three discuss their work with curator Lisa Sutcliffe this Thursday, January 23, at 6:15 pm at the Milwaukee Art Museum.  

  5. strange-rs:

Michael Dennington
  6. lbmdispatch:

    Best Buy. Thanksgiving. Houston.

    By Alec Soth

  7. Rob Hornstra “Monument to Russian-Georgian Friendship” (2013) from series “The Sochi Project”

“Winter Olympics in a subtropical resort. Surrounded by conflict zones. The most expensive Games ever. This is the idea being realized in Sochi.” So begins “An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus,” a photo book, published by Aperture, by the photographer Rob Hornstra and the writer Arnold van Bruggen, the final chapter of their long-term collaboration, The Sochi Project.

http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/photobooth/2013/11/slide-show-the-sochi-project.html#slide_ss_0=1

    Rob Hornstra “Monument to Russian-Georgian Friendship” (2013) from series “The Sochi Project”

    “Winter Olympics in a subtropical resort. Surrounded by conflict zones. The most expensive Games ever. This is the idea being realized in Sochi.” So begins “An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus,” a photo book, published by Aperture, by the photographer Rob Hornstra and the writer Arnold van Bruggen, the final chapter of their long-term collaboration, The Sochi Project.

    http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/photobooth/2013/11/slide-show-the-sochi-project.html#slide_ss_0=1

  8. Jason Reed for Reuters. Great shot.

    Jason Reed for Reuters. Great shot.

  9. http://www.laravisual.com/old-finnish-people-with-things-on-their-heads/
http://karolinehjorth.wordpress.com
http://www.riittaikonen.com

OLD FINNISH PEOPLE WITH THINGS ON THEIR HEADS

Almost a year ago I discovered this photo series at Kiasma – The Museum of Modern Art in Helsinki, Finland.

Photographers, Karoline Hjorth and Riitta Ikonen came up with something truly peculiar and special, in their photo series Eyes As Big As Plates. Their subjects are old, super serious and Finnish, all while wearing ridiculous “organic” head pieces and attire…need I say more?

    http://www.laravisual.com/old-finnish-people-with-things-on-their-heads/ http://karolinehjorth.wordpress.com http://www.riittaikonen.com

    OLD FINNISH PEOPLE WITH THINGS ON THEIR HEADS

    Almost a year ago I discovered this photo series at Kiasma – The Museum of Modern Art in Helsinki, Finland.

    Photographers, Karoline Hjorth and Riitta Ikonen came up with something truly peculiar and special, in their photo series Eyes As Big As Plates. Their subjects are old, super serious and Finnish, all while wearing ridiculous “organic” head pieces and attire…need I say more?

  10. timelightbox:

    Photograph by Adam Dean—Panos for TIME

    Seven Days of Tragedy: Photographer Adam Dean Recounts Covering Typhoon Haiyan for TIME.

  11. from: http://flakphoto.com/photo/ron-cowie-kingdom-of-obviousness

Ron Cowie
Kingdom Of Obviousness, 2008
From the Leaving Babylon series
Website - RonCowiephoto.com

Ron Cowie is a master platinum printer and photographer who specializes in large format landscapes and portraits. He is a member of APA, SPE and teaches 19th century photo processes at the New England School of Photography in Boston, Massachusetts. Ron studied at The New England School Of Photography where he majored in Advertising and Editorial Photography. He also learned the platinum printing process and worked as a private darkroom technician for a select group of Boston photographers. Ron’s interest in the beauty of life in all stages is the focus of his camera and print work. His images celebrate the temporality of life and examine the permanence of change. He lives in Charlestown, Rhode Island

    from: http://flakphoto.com/photo/ron-cowie-kingdom-of-obviousness

    Ron Cowie Kingdom Of Obviousness, 2008
    From the Leaving Babylon series Website - RonCowiephoto.com

    Ron Cowie is a master platinum printer and photographer who specializes in large format landscapes and portraits. He is a member of APA, SPE and teaches 19th century photo processes at the New England School of Photography in Boston, Massachusetts. Ron studied at The New England School Of Photography where he majored in Advertising and Editorial Photography. He also learned the platinum printing process and worked as a private darkroom technician for a select group of Boston photographers. Ron’s interest in the beauty of life in all stages is the focus of his camera and print work. His images celebrate the temporality of life and examine the permanence of change. He lives in Charlestown, Rhode Island

    • greatleapsideways:

"This constitutes the terrible plausibility of these images, and part of the basis for their success: they do describe and also enact a world in which people are socially atomized, politically weak, and are governed by their place in the image world. In demanding that the maximum visual detail be wrung from their subjects, they silence and still them. In their seamless, high-resolution depictions, they present the victory of the image world over its human subjects as total and eternal.
            While the results may hold apparently radical elements – that the passivity and image victimhood of the subjects may rebound on their viewers – the ambiguity of such images finally salvages artist and viewer. Such images oscillate between identification and distancing, honoring and belittling, critical recognition and the enjoyment of spectacle, and access to the real and the critique of realist representation. Despite the vast amount of data in these images, their specificity is low in terms of unambiguous statements about their subjects. Given that lack of specificity, so standard a feature of art-world production, what is highlighted instead (as Rosler argued) is self-projection by the photographer, and, we should add, by the viewer. Dijkstra says that the bathers in the beach pictures are “more or less a self-portrait.” So we find ourselves in that familiar real of thorough ambiguity, complex as a trap for thought, though far from complex, indeed clichéd, as a configuration in art production, in which, in the free-trade zone of the art work, artist, and viewer are offered matching opportunities for the apparently non-instrumental play of their creative and intellectual faculties.”
 — Julian Stallabrass What’s In A Face?: Blankness and Significance in Contemporary Art Photography in October, Vol. 122 (Fall 2007)
All images from Portraits © Rineke Dijkstra.
    • greatleapsideways:

"This constitutes the terrible plausibility of these images, and part of the basis for their success: they do describe and also enact a world in which people are socially atomized, politically weak, and are governed by their place in the image world. In demanding that the maximum visual detail be wrung from their subjects, they silence and still them. In their seamless, high-resolution depictions, they present the victory of the image world over its human subjects as total and eternal.
            While the results may hold apparently radical elements – that the passivity and image victimhood of the subjects may rebound on their viewers – the ambiguity of such images finally salvages artist and viewer. Such images oscillate between identification and distancing, honoring and belittling, critical recognition and the enjoyment of spectacle, and access to the real and the critique of realist representation. Despite the vast amount of data in these images, their specificity is low in terms of unambiguous statements about their subjects. Given that lack of specificity, so standard a feature of art-world production, what is highlighted instead (as Rosler argued) is self-projection by the photographer, and, we should add, by the viewer. Dijkstra says that the bathers in the beach pictures are “more or less a self-portrait.” So we find ourselves in that familiar real of thorough ambiguity, complex as a trap for thought, though far from complex, indeed clichéd, as a configuration in art production, in which, in the free-trade zone of the art work, artist, and viewer are offered matching opportunities for the apparently non-instrumental play of their creative and intellectual faculties.”
 — Julian Stallabrass What’s In A Face?: Blankness and Significance in Contemporary Art Photography in October, Vol. 122 (Fall 2007)
All images from Portraits © Rineke Dijkstra.
    • greatleapsideways:

"This constitutes the terrible plausibility of these images, and part of the basis for their success: they do describe and also enact a world in which people are socially atomized, politically weak, and are governed by their place in the image world. In demanding that the maximum visual detail be wrung from their subjects, they silence and still them. In their seamless, high-resolution depictions, they present the victory of the image world over its human subjects as total and eternal.
            While the results may hold apparently radical elements – that the passivity and image victimhood of the subjects may rebound on their viewers – the ambiguity of such images finally salvages artist and viewer. Such images oscillate between identification and distancing, honoring and belittling, critical recognition and the enjoyment of spectacle, and access to the real and the critique of realist representation. Despite the vast amount of data in these images, their specificity is low in terms of unambiguous statements about their subjects. Given that lack of specificity, so standard a feature of art-world production, what is highlighted instead (as Rosler argued) is self-projection by the photographer, and, we should add, by the viewer. Dijkstra says that the bathers in the beach pictures are “more or less a self-portrait.” So we find ourselves in that familiar real of thorough ambiguity, complex as a trap for thought, though far from complex, indeed clichéd, as a configuration in art production, in which, in the free-trade zone of the art work, artist, and viewer are offered matching opportunities for the apparently non-instrumental play of their creative and intellectual faculties.”
 — Julian Stallabrass What’s In A Face?: Blankness and Significance in Contemporary Art Photography in October, Vol. 122 (Fall 2007)
All images from Portraits © Rineke Dijkstra.
    • greatleapsideways:

"This constitutes the terrible plausibility of these images, and part of the basis for their success: they do describe and also enact a world in which people are socially atomized, politically weak, and are governed by their place in the image world. In demanding that the maximum visual detail be wrung from their subjects, they silence and still them. In their seamless, high-resolution depictions, they present the victory of the image world over its human subjects as total and eternal.
            While the results may hold apparently radical elements – that the passivity and image victimhood of the subjects may rebound on their viewers – the ambiguity of such images finally salvages artist and viewer. Such images oscillate between identification and distancing, honoring and belittling, critical recognition and the enjoyment of spectacle, and access to the real and the critique of realist representation. Despite the vast amount of data in these images, their specificity is low in terms of unambiguous statements about their subjects. Given that lack of specificity, so standard a feature of art-world production, what is highlighted instead (as Rosler argued) is self-projection by the photographer, and, we should add, by the viewer. Dijkstra says that the bathers in the beach pictures are “more or less a self-portrait.” So we find ourselves in that familiar real of thorough ambiguity, complex as a trap for thought, though far from complex, indeed clichéd, as a configuration in art production, in which, in the free-trade zone of the art work, artist, and viewer are offered matching opportunities for the apparently non-instrumental play of their creative and intellectual faculties.”
 — Julian Stallabrass What’s In A Face?: Blankness and Significance in Contemporary Art Photography in October, Vol. 122 (Fall 2007)
All images from Portraits © Rineke Dijkstra.
    • greatleapsideways:

"This constitutes the terrible plausibility of these images, and part of the basis for their success: they do describe and also enact a world in which people are socially atomized, politically weak, and are governed by their place in the image world. In demanding that the maximum visual detail be wrung from their subjects, they silence and still them. In their seamless, high-resolution depictions, they present the victory of the image world over its human subjects as total and eternal.
            While the results may hold apparently radical elements – that the passivity and image victimhood of the subjects may rebound on their viewers – the ambiguity of such images finally salvages artist and viewer. Such images oscillate between identification and distancing, honoring and belittling, critical recognition and the enjoyment of spectacle, and access to the real and the critique of realist representation. Despite the vast amount of data in these images, their specificity is low in terms of unambiguous statements about their subjects. Given that lack of specificity, so standard a feature of art-world production, what is highlighted instead (as Rosler argued) is self-projection by the photographer, and, we should add, by the viewer. Dijkstra says that the bathers in the beach pictures are “more or less a self-portrait.” So we find ourselves in that familiar real of thorough ambiguity, complex as a trap for thought, though far from complex, indeed clichéd, as a configuration in art production, in which, in the free-trade zone of the art work, artist, and viewer are offered matching opportunities for the apparently non-instrumental play of their creative and intellectual faculties.”
 — Julian Stallabrass What’s In A Face?: Blankness and Significance in Contemporary Art Photography in October, Vol. 122 (Fall 2007)
All images from Portraits © Rineke Dijkstra.
    • greatleapsideways:

"This constitutes the terrible plausibility of these images, and part of the basis for their success: they do describe and also enact a world in which people are socially atomized, politically weak, and are governed by their place in the image world. In demanding that the maximum visual detail be wrung from their subjects, they silence and still them. In their seamless, high-resolution depictions, they present the victory of the image world over its human subjects as total and eternal.
            While the results may hold apparently radical elements – that the passivity and image victimhood of the subjects may rebound on their viewers – the ambiguity of such images finally salvages artist and viewer. Such images oscillate between identification and distancing, honoring and belittling, critical recognition and the enjoyment of spectacle, and access to the real and the critique of realist representation. Despite the vast amount of data in these images, their specificity is low in terms of unambiguous statements about their subjects. Given that lack of specificity, so standard a feature of art-world production, what is highlighted instead (as Rosler argued) is self-projection by the photographer, and, we should add, by the viewer. Dijkstra says that the bathers in the beach pictures are “more or less a self-portrait.” So we find ourselves in that familiar real of thorough ambiguity, complex as a trap for thought, though far from complex, indeed clichéd, as a configuration in art production, in which, in the free-trade zone of the art work, artist, and viewer are offered matching opportunities for the apparently non-instrumental play of their creative and intellectual faculties.”
 — Julian Stallabrass What’s In A Face?: Blankness and Significance in Contemporary Art Photography in October, Vol. 122 (Fall 2007)
All images from Portraits © Rineke Dijkstra.
    • greatleapsideways:

"This constitutes the terrible plausibility of these images, and part of the basis for their success: they do describe and also enact a world in which people are socially atomized, politically weak, and are governed by their place in the image world. In demanding that the maximum visual detail be wrung from their subjects, they silence and still them. In their seamless, high-resolution depictions, they present the victory of the image world over its human subjects as total and eternal.
            While the results may hold apparently radical elements – that the passivity and image victimhood of the subjects may rebound on their viewers – the ambiguity of such images finally salvages artist and viewer. Such images oscillate between identification and distancing, honoring and belittling, critical recognition and the enjoyment of spectacle, and access to the real and the critique of realist representation. Despite the vast amount of data in these images, their specificity is low in terms of unambiguous statements about their subjects. Given that lack of specificity, so standard a feature of art-world production, what is highlighted instead (as Rosler argued) is self-projection by the photographer, and, we should add, by the viewer. Dijkstra says that the bathers in the beach pictures are “more or less a self-portrait.” So we find ourselves in that familiar real of thorough ambiguity, complex as a trap for thought, though far from complex, indeed clichéd, as a configuration in art production, in which, in the free-trade zone of the art work, artist, and viewer are offered matching opportunities for the apparently non-instrumental play of their creative and intellectual faculties.”
 — Julian Stallabrass What’s In A Face?: Blankness and Significance in Contemporary Art Photography in October, Vol. 122 (Fall 2007)
All images from Portraits © Rineke Dijkstra.
    • greatleapsideways:

"This constitutes the terrible plausibility of these images, and part of the basis for their success: they do describe and also enact a world in which people are socially atomized, politically weak, and are governed by their place in the image world. In demanding that the maximum visual detail be wrung from their subjects, they silence and still them. In their seamless, high-resolution depictions, they present the victory of the image world over its human subjects as total and eternal.
            While the results may hold apparently radical elements – that the passivity and image victimhood of the subjects may rebound on their viewers – the ambiguity of such images finally salvages artist and viewer. Such images oscillate between identification and distancing, honoring and belittling, critical recognition and the enjoyment of spectacle, and access to the real and the critique of realist representation. Despite the vast amount of data in these images, their specificity is low in terms of unambiguous statements about their subjects. Given that lack of specificity, so standard a feature of art-world production, what is highlighted instead (as Rosler argued) is self-projection by the photographer, and, we should add, by the viewer. Dijkstra says that the bathers in the beach pictures are “more or less a self-portrait.” So we find ourselves in that familiar real of thorough ambiguity, complex as a trap for thought, though far from complex, indeed clichéd, as a configuration in art production, in which, in the free-trade zone of the art work, artist, and viewer are offered matching opportunities for the apparently non-instrumental play of their creative and intellectual faculties.”
 — Julian Stallabrass What’s In A Face?: Blankness and Significance in Contemporary Art Photography in October, Vol. 122 (Fall 2007)
All images from Portraits © Rineke Dijkstra.

    greatleapsideways:

    "This constitutes the terrible plausibility of these images, and part of the basis for their success: they do describe and also enact a world in which people are socially atomized, politically weak, and are governed by their place in the image world. In demanding that the maximum visual detail be wrung from their subjects, they silence and still them. In their seamless, high-resolution depictions, they present the victory of the image world over its human subjects as total and eternal.

                While the results may hold apparently radical elements – that the passivity and image victimhood of the subjects may rebound on their viewers – the ambiguity of such images finally salvages artist and viewer. Such images oscillate between identification and distancing, honoring and belittling, critical recognition and the enjoyment of spectacle, and access to the real and the critique of realist representation. Despite the vast amount of data in these images, their specificity is low in terms of unambiguous statements about their subjects. Given that lack of specificity, so standard a feature of art-world production, what is highlighted instead (as Rosler argued) is self-projection by the photographer, and, we should add, by the viewer. Dijkstra says that the bathers in the beach pictures are “more or less a self-portrait.” So we find ourselves in that familiar real of thorough ambiguity, complex as a trap for thought, though far from complex, indeed clichéd, as a configuration in art production, in which, in the free-trade zone of the art work, artist, and viewer are offered matching opportunities for the apparently non-instrumental play of their creative and intellectual faculties.”

    Julian Stallabrass What’s In A Face?: Blankness and Significance in Contemporary Art Photography in October, Vol. 122 (Fall 2007)

    All images from Portraits © Rineke Dijkstra.

  12. Radiohead “I Might Be Wrong”

  13. Paul Gaffney - “We Make the Path by Walking”
http://www.paulgaffneyphotography.com/

    Paul Gaffney - “We Make the Path by Walking” http://www.paulgaffneyphotography.com/

  14. Design your own street!